Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Keeping Yourself Informed

October 29/30

We have made the point before in this course that technology is ever evolving. When you become a teacher, technology will exist that does not yet today, and it may offer you and your students new opportunities for teaching and learning that you won't be able to take advantage of if you don't even know about it.

But how will you learn about it and about how to use it?

Although you may have the occasional faculty in-service meeting to demonstrate the latest upgrade to PowerSchool or the features of the newest version of Microsoft Office, for the most part you will be responsible for your own professional development regarding educational technology. Fortunately many sources of information are available to help you stay educated on your own about how to teach the "technology natives" in your classroom.

Practice doing that now with this on-line discussion. (This assignment is due 11:00 A.M., Monday, November 3.)

First, go to our course page on iMoberg. There you will find links to five sources of current information, developing ideas, and breaking news in the field of educational technology. Click on each of them, searching for an article (related to educational technology) that captures your interest. Once you find one, read it.

Then, post here a comment that tells (1) what you read [name the article title and its source], (2) what it is about, and (3) what you think about what you read.

Then, respond to at least one other classmate's comment, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations or questions that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement with your classmate's ideas. When replying to your classmate, specify in your writing the name of the person to whom you're replying (e.g., "Shannon, I like your idea about using ___, which makes me think that I could use it with my students by . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 11:00 A.M., Monday, November 3; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to reply to someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment well in advance of this deadline.

Friday, October 24, 2008

Issues in Curriculum Development

October 24-31

While reading and annotating "Issues in Curriculum Development" (see Week 9 and Week 10), use this blog post as a hub for exchanging your thoughts, questions, discoveries, and connections (to your past learning, to your future teaching) while you're in the midst of reading.

To make this most useful for both yourself and your SEED 300 classmates, check back frequently throughout the weekend and week and participate in this on-line conversation with them.

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your questions and comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments.

To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Kelly, I wondered almost the same thing, except that in my case, I . . .").

P.S. Participating in this on-line discussion is optional, although I think it has the potential to be both practical (increasing your understanding of what you read) and enlightening (revealing new insights as shared by your classmates) -- so I'm encouraging you (but not requiring you) to participate.

Monday, October 13, 2008

Foundations of Curriculum and Teaching

October 17-20

As you read the four Parts of Section III: Philosophy of Education at this site, use the comment feature of this blog post to discuss with one another what you're reading:
  • what's challenging to understand,
  • what you're "getting,"
  • what you wonder about,
  • what you disagree with,
  • what you've already heard about in other courses,
  • what evidence you've seen in the schools of what you're reading,
  • etc.
By 12:00 P.M., Monday, October 20, post (below) your thoughts as triggered by the reading. Your comment should reflect your engagement with your reading (see the bulleted list of suggestions above).

Then respond to at least one other classmate's post by 12:00 P.M., Monday, October 20, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement not only with the reading but also with your classmate's ideas.
You know the routine for how to post your own comment as well as how to post a reply to someone else's comment. See earlier blog posts and the instructions to the right to refresh your memory. (Pay special attention to how to include your name with your comment; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comment!)

(Refer to the description of the assignment to know what to be prepared to do in class on Monday, October 20.)

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled at 12:00 P.M., Monday, October 20; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to comment on someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment in advance of this deadline.

Thursday, October 2, 2008

Methods Madness

October 6-10 and November 3-7

You are not alone during the methods block field experience! You will be nervous, excited, bored, proud, frustrated, thrilled, confident, doubtful, etc., throughout your time in the secondary classroom, but your fellow SEED 300 classmates will most likely be going through many of the same things.

Use this blog post as a hub for exchanging your thoughts about methods block while you are all in the midst of it.
  • If you have a question for your classmates, post it here for them to respond to.
  • If you have a classroom story to share with them, post it here for them to comment on.
  • If you have feedback on the questions and stories that others have posted, post your reply as a comment here.
To make this most useful for both yourself and your SEED 300 classmates, check back frequently throughout each methods block week and participate in this on-line conversation with them.

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your questions, stories, and comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments.

To reply to someone else's story or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, the exact same thing happened to me when I . . .").

P.S. Participating in this on-line discussion is optional, although I think it has the potential to be both therapeutic and enlightening -- so I'm encouraging you (but not requiring you) to participate.