Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Nat'l Day on Writing 2017: Writing Marathon, Section 5 (10:00-11:15)

In honor of the National Day on Writing (October 20, 2017), you participated in a "writing marathon" during class on October 19. The result was a passage of polished writing for you to share with students from another section of College Composition I.

First, write a comment on this blog post in which you share that polished work of writing from the October 19 writing marathon. Before clicking the "Publish Your Comment" button, you will be asked to "Choose an identity."
  • You could sign in with a Google account or an OpenID, if you have one.
  • Or you could click "Name/URL" and enter your name. Your first name would suffice.
  • Please do not click "Anonymous." That would not allow me to know who posted the writing, so I wouldn't be able to give you credit for your work!
This ^ first part (posting your own writing) is due at the end of class on October 19.


Second, visit the blog post that features the writing marathon selections from another section of College Composition I. Click here to go to that blog post and read those students' writing.

From that post, select one student's writing sample that you like. Write a comment on that blog post that does these things:
  1. names the writer upon whose writing you wish to comment;
  2. provides some compliments on that student's writing; and
  3. cites at least one detail from that student's writing and tells what is "good" about that aspect of his or her writing (e.g., "Pat, I especially like your line about the sun's 'burning through the canopy of leaves overhead' because it's such a clear detail. I can clearly visualize the morning sun's rays coming through the leaves of the trees near King Pavilion.").
This ^ second part (commenting on the writing of a student from another class) is due a half-hour before the start of class on October 24.

Nat'l Day on Writing 2017: Writing Marathon, Section 2 (8:30-9:45)

In honor of the National Day on Writing (October 20, 2017), you participated in a "writing marathon" during class on October 19. The result was a passage of polished writing for you to share with students from another section of College Composition I.

First, write a comment on this blog post in which you share that polished work of writing from the October 19 writing marathon. Before clicking the "Publish Your Comment" button, you will be asked to "Choose an identity."
  • You could sign in with a Google account or an OpenID, if you have one.
  • Or you could click "Name/URL" and enter your name. Your first name would suffice.
  • Please do not click "Anonymous." That would not allow me to know who posted the writing, so I wouldn't be able to give you credit for your work!
This ^ first part (posting your own writing) is due at the end of class on October 19.


Second, visit the blog post that features the writing marathon selections from another section of College Composition I. Click here to go to that blog post and read those students' writing.

From that post, select one student's writing sample that you like. Write a comment on that blog post that does these things:
  1. names the writer upon whose writing you wish to comment;
  2. provides some compliments on that student's writing; and
  3. cites at least one detail from that student's writing and tells what is "good" about that aspect of his or her writing (e.g., "Pat, I especially like your line about the sun's 'burning through the canopy of leaves overhead' because it's such a clear detail. I can clearly visualize the morning sun's rays coming through the leaves of the trees near King Pavilion.").
This ^ second part (commenting on the writing of a student from another class) is due a half-hour before the start of class on October 24.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Using a Blog in the Classroom

Some teachers use a blog as an online "discussion room" where their students go to share their thoughts and respond to their classmates' ideas.  A teacher may post a discussion topic or question to which students write their responses, and students may be asked to write in reaction to their peers' responses, too.  This approach to blogging works well with issues or matters of opinion: having students react to a novel that they're reading, or to a political issue, or to current events in the world of science or technology, etc.

Some teachers use a blog as an online newsletter, often intended for students and their parents to read.  An elementary teacher may assign one student each day to write a blog post that summarizes that day's classroom activities, giving students practical experience writing for a real audience: the children's parents, who can log on at home and read about their kids' day at school.  Or a teacher him-/herself could write about classroom events, share announcements and reminders, post descriptions of assignments, share links to online resources to help with homework, etc.

Some teachers use a blog as a means of interacting with other teachers.  Teachers can post lesson ideas or teaching-related questions and get feedback from other teachers reading that blog.

To practice that last use of blogging, please do two things:

FIRST, read a teacher's blog or a teaching-related blog and write a comment on this blog post that
  1. names the blog that you read,
  2. shares its URL [or Web address: www.imoberg.com, for example],
  3. describes it,
  4. and offers your perspective on its content: for whom it would be useful, how to make use of that blog, etc.
SECOND, read through the other comments on this blog post (the comments left by the other participants in this room today) and respond to at least one of them.  You could share your thoughts about something that the writer has mentioned, or you could skim the blog that the writer is writing about and give your own opinion of it.

You could use your favorite search engine (e.g., Google, Bing, Yahoo!, etc.) to look for a blog, or you could select one from one of these sources:

Wednesday, July 6, 2011

Reflection on Day One

In today's class, you
  • reviewed some technology terminology
  • discussed the standards requiring teachers to use technology
  • used a virtual environment (Wii) for educational purposes
  • discussed cloud computing (Tegrity, Moodle, Google Docs, SkyDrive) as a tool for teachers
  • created an online avatar (Voki)
  • created a classroom Web site (Wix)
  • used a blog (Blogger) for educational purposes
  • discussed the use of screencasting software (Jing) to instruct students
  • created an online presentation (Prezi)
Which of these types of technology do you think you will implement in your own teaching?  How do you plan to utilize it?  How will it affect your students' learning?