Sunday, December 27, 2009

Education News: December 27, 2009

December 23 | Edutopia shares ideas for implementing practices related to social and emotional learning in your school in stages: in five minutes, five days, five weeks, five months, and five years -- Edutopia

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Week 15: Lesson Mastery (SEED 300)

Please read Unit D (ch. 21-24) from Wong & Wong's The First Days of School. Annotate the text as you read, marking ideas with which you agree or disagree, ideas that surprise you or are new to you, and questions that occur to you while reading.

After reading ch. 21-24, post a comment here in which you do three things:
  1. Write about something that you marked in the text while reading these chapters from the Wongs' book.
  2. Write about how something that you read in these chapters is connected to something that you read in chapters 1, 2, 3, and 4 of Marzano's book. Provide specific examples from Marzano's book to demonstrate or support your points.
  3. Write about how something that you read in these chapters of the Wongs' book is connected to something from your own experience: another education course or text on the topic of lesson mastery, a teacher whom you have observed, your own methods block classroom, a teacher from when you yourself were a secondary student, etc.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on one of the same concepts, also include in your own comments your response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what additional thoughts or new perspective can you contribute rather than merely repeating what someone else has said? (e.g., "Shannon, I marked the same idea from chapter 24, but for a different reason: I think that ___")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M., Tuesday, April 28; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Week 14: Classroom Management (SEED 300)

Please read the first half of Unit C (ch. 11-15) from Wong & Wong's The First Days of School. Annotate the text as you read, marking ideas with which you agree or disagree, ideas that surprise you or are new to you, and questions that occur to you while reading.

After reading ch. 11-15, post a comment here in which you do three things:
  1. Write about something that you marked in the text while reading these chapters from the Wongs' book.
  2. Write about how something that you read in this book is connected to something that you read in chapters 6 and 7 of Marzano's book. Provide specific examples from Marzano's book to demonstrate or support your points.
  3. Write about how something that you read in the Wongs' book is connected to something from your own experience: a teacher whom you have observed, your own methods block classroom, a teacher from when you yourself were a secondary student, another education course or text on the topic of classroom management, etc.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on one of the same concepts, also include in your own comments your response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what additional thoughts or new perspective can you contribute rather than merely repeating what someone else has said? (e.g., "Shannon, I marked the same idea from chapter 13, but for a different reason: I think that ___")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M., Tuesday, April 21; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Week 13: Basic Understandings of the Teacher (SEED 300)

Please read Unit A (ch. 1-5) from Wong & Wong's The First Days of School. You will notice that these chapters are shorter than those in our other texts with many more graphic elements within the pages. Some will find this visually appealing while others may find it more difficult to focus because of all the text boxes and sidebars. To help you concentrate on main points, highlight or annotate these things as you read:
  • ideas with which you agree
  • ideas with which you disagree
  • ideas that surprise you or are new to you
  • ideas that raise questions for you
  • etc.

After reading ch. 1-5, post a comment here in which you do three things:

  1. Write about something that you marked (regarding the bullets above) as you read these chapters from the Wongs' book.
  2. Write about how something that you read in this book is connected to something that you read in Marzano's book.
  3. Write about how something that you read in this book is connected to something that you read in Oliva's book.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on one of the same concepts, also include in your own comments your response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what additional thoughts or new perspective can you contribute rather than merely repeating what someone else has said? (e.g., "Shannon, I marked the same idea from chapter two, but for a different reason: I think that ___")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M., Tuesday, April 14; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Week 12: Audiovisual and Distance Technologies (EDUC 210)

Please read these chapters from our course text:
  • Ch. 9: Audiovisual Technologies (pp. 314-358)
  • Ch. 10: Distance Education: Using Technology to Redefine the Classroom (pp. 359-395)

You'll note on the course schedule that we're previewing the chapters in class on Thursday, April 2; discussing them in class on Tuesday, April 7; and taking a quiz on them in class on Thursday, April 9. The preview and subsequent discussion will involve your helping to determine which concepts in each chapter ought to be included on the quiz (see this and, more importantly, this).

As you read, please post a comment here in which you share your thoughts about one of the concepts from either chapter. Demonstrate that you are thinking about what you are reading by sharing those thoughts with the rest of us. You may tell us about a concept that seems particularly relevant to your future teaching and why; something with which you disagree and why; something new that seems interesting to you and why; etc.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same concept, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmates think about that concept? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___")

Please do not merely repeat what a previous commenter has already written. Instead, contribute something new to the online conversation.

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, April 9; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Week 10: Educational Technology in the News

NOTE: This discussion board assignment does NOT involve your reading an article from the list on the homepage of iMoberg, as you have done in the past. Please carefully read the directions below.

Search the World Wide Web for news articles on current events, trends, developments, practices, issues, etc., related to educational technology. You might use your favorite search engine and start with search terms like "educational," "technology," and "news" to start your search. When you find an article that interests you, read it and copy the URL of the Web page from which you read it. (For example, the URL for our university's Web page is http://www.dickinsonstate.edu/.)

Then post a comment here in which you (1) paste the URL of the news article that you read, (2) summarize the article, and (3) share with us your thoughts about the article and the educational technology issue that it's about.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same article or a similar educational technology issue, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmate thinks about the article? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, March 26; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Week 10: Reflecting on Effective Teaching

FIRST
Choose and write about one of these options:
  • Write about an effective teaching technique from ch. 3-6 of Marzano's book--a technique that you haven't used before but that seems promising for the courses that you will someday teach. Tell why it appeals to you, how it would be useful for your students, how you would use it, etc.
  • Compare Marzano's ideas in ch. 5 (on engaging students) with the ideas in the online article "Ten Steps to Better Student Engagement" by Tristan de Frondeville. Tell what similarities you see between the two, what differences, what ideas Marzano and de Frondeville together give you for engaging your own students, etc.
  • Share a story of a teacher you know who did something well related to ch. 3-6 of Marzano's book (helping students deepen their understanding or practice their skills or predict and afterward reflect; engaging students in the classroom; managing the classroom). At the end of your story, identify the probable reasons for this teacher's success with this teaching technique. Tell also how you might replicate this success with your own students.

THEN
Post a second comment that replies to someone else's comment. Your reply to your classmate should show engagement with his/her ideas, so a simple "Yes, I agree" will not suffice. Instead, share your thoughts about his/her ideas for using a particular effective teaching technique--offer suggestions, connect his/her ideas to your own future teaching, write about his/her ideas as they relate to your own personal experiences, etc.

To reply in response to someone else's comment, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled at 8:00 A.M. on Tuesday, March 24; you will not be able to post a comment after that time, so tend to your posting and replying well in advance.

Week 9: Reflecting on Effective Teaching

FIRST
Write about an effective teaching technique from ch. 1-2 of Marzano's book--a technique that you haven't used before but that seems promising for the courses that you will someday teach. Tell why it appeals to you, how it would be useful for your students, how you would use it, etc.

THEN
Post a second comment that replies to someone else's comment. Your reply to your classmate should show engagement with his/her ideas, so a simple "Yes, I agree" will not suffice. Instead, share your thoughts about his/her ideas for using a particular effective teaching technique--offer suggestions, connect his/her ideas to your own future teaching, write about his/her ideas as they relate to your own personal experiences, etc.

To reply in response to someone else's comment, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled at 8:00 A.M. on Tuesday, March 10; you will not be able to post a comment after that time, so tend to your posting and replying well in advance.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Week 6: Education News (EDUC 210)

Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same article, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmates think about the article? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, February 19; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Thursday, February 5, 2009

Week 5: Education News (EDUC 210)

Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same article, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmates think about the article? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, February 12; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Weeks 7 and 11: Methods Block (SEED 300)

February 23-27 and March 30-April 3

You are not alone during the methods block field experience! You will be nervous, excited, bored, proud, frustrated, thrilled, confident, doubtful, etc., throughout your time in the secondary classroom, but your fellow SEED 300 classmates will most likely be going through many of the same things.

Use this blog post as a hub for exchanging your thoughts about methods block while you are all in the midst of it.
  • If you have a question for your classmates, post it here for them to respond to.
  • If you have a classroom story to share with them, post it here for them to comment on.
  • If you have feedback on the questions and stories that others have posted, post your reply as a comment here.
To make this most useful for both yourself and your SEED 300 classmates, check back frequently throughout each methods block week and participate in this on-line conversation with them.


See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your questions, stories, and comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments.

To reply to someone else's story or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, the exact same thing happened to me when I . . .").

Week 5: Thinking About Your Reading (SEED 300)

FIRST
Browse through the portions of Developing the Curriculum (Oliva, 2009) that we have read thus far. Post a comment here that addresses three things:
  1. something you didn't know before that you do now because of this book
  2. something you already knew that this book told you more about or gave you a different perspective on
  3. something from this book that still is not entirely clear to you
THEN
Post a second comment that replies to your classmates. Read others' comments before you and post a reply that addresses two things:
  1. something written by someone else that you'd like to agree or disagree with--including details, examples, elaboration, etc. (a simple "Yep, what she said" isn't enough!)
  2. an effort on your part to answer somebody else's question or to shed light on something that he/she said still isn't entirely clear to him/her
To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled at 8:00 A.M. on Tuesday, February 10; you will not be able to post a comment after that time, so tend to your posting and replying well in advance.

Thursday, January 29, 2009

Week 4: Education News (EDUC 210)

Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same article, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmates think about the article? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, February 5; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Week 4: Education News (SEED 300)

FIRST
Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article [tell us which one you read] and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about. Look for an article that others before you have not yet read/written about already.

If you are able to identify a curricular or instructional issue within the article, be sure to address that, too.

THEN
Post a second comment that replies to someone else's comment. For this, choose a classmate who read something that you did not and respond to his/her posted comment, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement with your classmate's ideas. (You do not have to read what he/she did in order to react to his/her comment, but you may like to do so.

To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled at 8:00 A.M. on Tuesday, February 3; you will not be able to post a comment after that time, so tend to your posting and replying well in advance.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Week 3: Education News (EDUC 210)

Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same article, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmates think about the article? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. on Thursday, January 29; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Week 3: Education News (SEED 300)

FIRST
Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article [tell us which one you read] and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about. Look for an article that others before you have not yet read/written about already.

If you are able to identify a curricular or instructional issue within the article, be sure to address that, too.

THEN
Post a second comment that replies to someone else's comment. For this, choose a classmate who read something that you did not and respond to his/her posted comment, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement with your classmate's ideas. (You do not have to read what he/she did in order to react to his/her comment, but you may like to do so.)

To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE
The commenting feature will be disabled at 8:00 A.M. on Tuesday, January 27; you will not be able to post a comment after that time, so tend to your posting and replying well in advance.

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Inaugural Use of Discussion Board

Peruse the list of educational news articles available on our course Web site's homepage. Choose an article, read it, and post a comment here that (1) proves that you read the article and (2) shares with us your thoughts about the article and the educational issue that it's about.

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the same article, also include in your own comments a response to that person's (or those persons') comments. In other words, what do you think about what your classmates think about the article? (e.g., "Shannon, I understand what you mean when you write ___, but I think ___ . . .")

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 8:00 A.M. Thursday, January 15; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.