Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Expanding Upon the Wongs' Chapter 24

December 5-8

As with previous on-line discussion board topics, post both a comment of your own and a reply to someone else's by the due date (see the course schedule). Please follow the instructions that follow.

For Your Comment
First, read what is assigned to you below:
  • students with last names beginning with A-H: read pp. 1-4 of this on cooperative learning and its structures
  • students with last names beginning with I-P: read pp. 7-11 of this on cooperative learning and procedures for implementing it
  • students with last names beginning with Q-Z: read pp. 3-7 of this on cooperative learning and handling dysfunctional teams

Then post your thoughts as triggered by the reading. Your comment should reflect your engagement both with the reading assigned to you (above) and with your reading of chapter 24 from the Wongs' book. (How does your assigned reading relate to something[s] addressed by the Wongs? How does your assigned reading support the Wongs, contradict them, or expand on something suggested by them?)

For Your Reply to Someone Else's Comment
Choose a classmate who read something that you did not and respond to his/her posted comment, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connects or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement with your classmate's ideas. (However, you do not have to read what he/she did in order to react to his/her comment . . . unless you want to, that is.)

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments and replies. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments. To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Harold, I wonder if the Wongs would agree with you when you write ___").

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled at 12:00 P.M., Monday, December 8; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to reply to someone else's comment, you will need to tend to this assignment in advance of this deadline.

On-line Course Management Tools (Section 2, Mon/Wed)

December 1-5

In light of this week's presentation on using course management tools to enhance your teaching of on-line, face-to-face, and hybrid courses, post here a comment in which you share your reactions. Refer specifically to information delivered by our presenter rather than to details that you just happen to know (i.e., having been present on that day will work in your favor!) Here are some options (you need not address all of these; perhaps choose just one):
  • What features of Blackboard/WebCT would be most useful for you and your students? Consider your teaching area and age of your students and suggest ways that you might make productive use of Blackboard/WebCT in your teaching.
  • Compare and contrast Tegrity and Wimba in terms of your future teaching. Which one seems a better fit for your teaching area and the age of your students? How would you make use of one or the other (or both)?
  • What uses do you see for Blackboard/WebCT, Tegrity, and/or Wimba other than helping you to teach? What other occasions might you find to make use of any of these tools (e.g., working as a coach or activity advisor, participating in professional development, interacting with parents, networking with other educators, etc.), and how would you use these tools?
  • Suggest limitations to the usefulness of any of these tools. What would you want to do with/for your students that you could not do using Blackboard/WebCT, Tegrity, or Wimba? How would you supplement your use of these tools in order to overcome those limitations?
  • Imagine a future teaching colleague who knows nothing about Blackboard/WebCT, Tegrity, or Wimba. How would you explain to him/her the differences and the pros and cons of each?

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the topic that you were hoping to write about, you still may do so yourself--simply also mention that person's comment when writing your own, and expand upon it when writing your own comment (e.g., "I totally agree with Darcy's comment about ___, and I have another idea for how to ___").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 12:00 P.M., Friday, December 5; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

On-line Course Management Tools (Section 1, Tue/Thu)

December 1-5

In light of this week's presentation on using course management tools to enhance your teaching of on-line, face-to-face, and hybrid courses, post here a comment in which you share your reactions. Refer specifically to information delivered by our presenter rather than to details that you just happen to know (i.e., having been present on that day will work in your favor!) Here are some options (you need not address all of these; perhaps choose just one):
  • What features of Blackboard/WebCT would be most useful for you and your students? Consider your teaching area and age of your students and suggest ways that you might make productive use of Blackboard/WebCT in your teaching.
  • Compare and contrast Tegrity and Wimba in terms of your future teaching. Which one seems a better fit for your teaching area and the age of your students? How would you make use of one or the other (or both)?
  • What uses do you see for Blackboard/WebCT, Tegrity, and/or Wimba other than helping you to teach? What other occasions might you find to make use of any of these tools (e.g., working as a coach or activity advisor, participating in professional development, interacting with parents, networking with other educators, etc.), and how would you use these tools?
  • Suggest limitations to the usefulness of any of these tools. What would you want to do with/for your students that you could not do using Blackboard/WebCT, Tegrity, or Wimba? How would you supplement your use of these tools in order to overcome those limitations?
  • Imagine a future teaching colleague who knows nothing about Blackboard/WebCT, Tegrity, or Wimba. How would you explain to him/her the differences and the pros and cons of each?

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the topic that you were hoping to write about, you still may do so yourself--simply also mention that person's comment when writing your own, and expand upon it when writing your own comment (e.g., "I totally agree with Darcy's comment about ___, and I have another idea for how to ___").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 12:00 P.M., Friday, December 5; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Thursday, November 20, 2008

Expanding Upon the Wongs' Unit D

November 21-24

As with previous on-line discussion board topics, post both a comment of your own and a reply to someone else's by the due date (see the course schedule). Follow the instructions that follow.

For Your Comment
First, read what is assigned to you below:
  • students with last names beginning with A-H -- read this on curriculum mapping
  • students with last names beginning with I-P -- read this on inquiry-based learning
  • students with last names beginning with Q-Z -- read this on mastery learning
Then, post your thoughts as triggered by the reading. Your comment should reflect your engagement both with the reading assigned to you (above) and with your reading of Unit D from the Wongs' book. (How does your assigned reading relate to something[s] addressed by the Wongs?)

For Your Reply to Someone Else's Comment
Choose a classmate who read something that you did not and respond to his/her posted comment, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement with your classmate's ideas. (However, you do not have to read what he/she did in order to react to his/her comment . . . unless you want to, that is.)

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your questions and comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments. To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, I wonder if the Wongs would agree with you when you write ___").

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled at 12:00 P.M., Monday, November 24; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to comment on someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment in advance of this deadline.

ITV (Section 2)

November 17-21

In light of this week's presentations on teaching via interactive TV (IVN or videoconferencing), post here a comment in which you share your reactions. Here are some options:

  • In the future if you are assigned to teach a course via interactive TV, what will you be sure to do? What will be challenges that you will keep in mind? How will you best utilize the ITV format to instruct your students?
  • In the future what uses besides teaching a course might you find for using interactive TV? What might it enable you to do that you couldn't (or that would be more difficult) without it? (Think of presentations that you might want to give, or teaching workshops that you might want to attend, etc.)
  • Think of your experience this week from a student's perspective. With that in mind, what would you be sure to do for your own students in the future if teaching them via interactive TV? What worked for you that would work for them? What didn't work for you that you would do differently for them?

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the topic that you were hoping to write about, you still may do so yourself--simply also mention that person's comment when writing your own, and expand upon it when writing your own comment (e.g., "I totally agree with Darcy's comment about ___, and I have another idea for how to ___").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 12:00 P.M., Friday, November 21; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

ITV (Section 1)

November 17-21

In light of this week's presentations on teaching via interactive TV (IVN or videoconferencing), post here a comment in which you share your reactions. Here are some options:
  • In the future if you are assigned to teach a course via interactive TV, what will you be sure to do? What will be challenges that you will keep in mind? How will you best utilize the ITV format to instruct your students?
  • In the future what uses besides teaching a course might you find for using interactive TV? What might it enable you to do that you couldn't (or that would be more difficult) without it? (Think of presentations that you might want to give, or teaching workshops that you might want to attend, etc.)
  • Think of your experience this week from a student's perspective. With that in mind, what would you be sure to do for your own students in the future if teaching them via interactive TV? What worked for you that would work for them? What didn't work for you that you would do differently for them?

If somebody before you has already posted a comment on the topic that you were hoping to write about, you still may do so yourself--simply also mention that person's comment when writing your own, and expand upon it when writing your own comment (e.g., "I totally agree with Darcy's comment about ___, and I have another idea for how to ___").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 12:00 P.M., Friday, November 21; you will not be able to post a comment after that time.

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Keeping Yourself Informed

October 29/30

We have made the point before in this course that technology is ever evolving. When you become a teacher, technology will exist that does not yet today, and it may offer you and your students new opportunities for teaching and learning that you won't be able to take advantage of if you don't even know about it.

But how will you learn about it and about how to use it?

Although you may have the occasional faculty in-service meeting to demonstrate the latest upgrade to PowerSchool or the features of the newest version of Microsoft Office, for the most part you will be responsible for your own professional development regarding educational technology. Fortunately many sources of information are available to help you stay educated on your own about how to teach the "technology natives" in your classroom.

Practice doing that now with this on-line discussion. (This assignment is due 11:00 A.M., Monday, November 3.)

First, go to our course page on iMoberg. There you will find links to five sources of current information, developing ideas, and breaking news in the field of educational technology. Click on each of them, searching for an article (related to educational technology) that captures your interest. Once you find one, read it.

Then, post here a comment that tells (1) what you read [name the article title and its source], (2) what it is about, and (3) what you think about what you read.

Then, respond to at least one other classmate's comment, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations or questions that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement with your classmate's ideas. When replying to your classmate, specify in your writing the name of the person to whom you're replying (e.g., "Shannon, I like your idea about using ___, which makes me think that I could use it with my students by . . .").

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comments!

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 11:00 A.M., Monday, November 3; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to reply to someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment well in advance of this deadline.

Friday, October 24, 2008

Issues in Curriculum Development

October 24-31

While reading and annotating "Issues in Curriculum Development" (see Week 9 and Week 10), use this blog post as a hub for exchanging your thoughts, questions, discoveries, and connections (to your past learning, to your future teaching) while you're in the midst of reading.

To make this most useful for both yourself and your SEED 300 classmates, check back frequently throughout the weekend and week and participate in this on-line conversation with them.

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your questions and comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments.

To reply in response to someone else's comment or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Kelly, I wondered almost the same thing, except that in my case, I . . .").

P.S. Participating in this on-line discussion is optional, although I think it has the potential to be both practical (increasing your understanding of what you read) and enlightening (revealing new insights as shared by your classmates) -- so I'm encouraging you (but not requiring you) to participate.

Monday, October 13, 2008

Foundations of Curriculum and Teaching

October 17-20

As you read the four Parts of Section III: Philosophy of Education at this site, use the comment feature of this blog post to discuss with one another what you're reading:
  • what's challenging to understand,
  • what you're "getting,"
  • what you wonder about,
  • what you disagree with,
  • what you've already heard about in other courses,
  • what evidence you've seen in the schools of what you're reading,
  • etc.
By 12:00 P.M., Monday, October 20, post (below) your thoughts as triggered by the reading. Your comment should reflect your engagement with your reading (see the bulleted list of suggestions above).

Then respond to at least one other classmate's post by 12:00 P.M., Monday, October 20, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement not only with the reading but also with your classmate's ideas.
You know the routine for how to post your own comment as well as how to post a reply to someone else's comment. See earlier blog posts and the instructions to the right to refresh your memory. (Pay special attention to how to include your name with your comment; I can't give you credit if I don't know who you are when I read your comment!)

(Refer to the description of the assignment to know what to be prepared to do in class on Monday, October 20.)

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled at 12:00 P.M., Monday, October 20; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to comment on someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment in advance of this deadline.

Thursday, October 2, 2008

Methods Madness

October 6-10 and November 3-7

You are not alone during the methods block field experience! You will be nervous, excited, bored, proud, frustrated, thrilled, confident, doubtful, etc., throughout your time in the secondary classroom, but your fellow SEED 300 classmates will most likely be going through many of the same things.

Use this blog post as a hub for exchanging your thoughts about methods block while you are all in the midst of it.
  • If you have a question for your classmates, post it here for them to respond to.
  • If you have a classroom story to share with them, post it here for them to comment on.
  • If you have feedback on the questions and stories that others have posted, post your reply as a comment here.
To make this most useful for both yourself and your SEED 300 classmates, check back frequently throughout each methods block week and participate in this on-line conversation with them.

See the right sidebar of this blog for instructions on posting your questions, stories, and comments. Pay special attention to how to make your name appear with your comments.

To reply to someone else's story or question, please specify that person in whatever comment you post in response (e.g., "Shannon, the exact same thing happened to me when I . . .").

P.S. Participating in this on-line discussion is optional, although I think it has the potential to be both therapeutic and enlightening -- so I'm encouraging you (but not requiring you) to participate.

Thursday, August 28, 2008

A Storm of Ideas

August 29

In today's class, we discussed and practiced brainstorming. To explore the topic further, I have asked you to read two items (and provided links to two more great resources, by the way) and then participate in an on-line conversation about them.

By 9:00 A.M., Friday, September 5, post (below) your thoughts as triggered by the reading. Your comment should reflect your engagement with your reading about brainstorming. Here are some options:
  • With your own students, how will you overcome the potential barriers to effective brainstorming?
  • Which brainstorming techniques seem best suited to the subjects that you are likely to teach?
  • Describe a teaching scenario in which you use a brainstorming technique productively with your own students.
To post your comment, click "Post a Comment" below and then type away! (Further instructions on posting comments are available to the right.)
Then respond to at least one other classmate's post by 9:00 A.M., Friday, September 5, reacting to or expanding upon his/her ideas and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. Your response should reflect your engagement not only with the reading but also with your classmate's ideas.

To reply to someone else, click "Post a Comment" below and specify in your own writing the person to whom you're replying (e.g., "Shannon, I like your idea about ___ and have a suggestion for you . . .").

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled 9:00 A.M., Friday, September 5; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own comment and to comment on someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment well in advance of this deadline.

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Technology Stories

August 26/27

In today's class, I asked you to write about an example of the use of technology during your own years as a student. Your story could be about a teacher's effective use of technology in teaching, or about your own effective use of technology to learn or to demonstrate your own learning, or about an instance of the ineffective use (yours, a fellow student's, or a teacher's) of technology in education.

By Thursday, August 28, 3:00 P.M., post here what you wrote--and, as you post, please revise for clarity what you wrote in class. To share your story here, click "Post a Comment" below and then type away!

Then respond to at least one other classmate's post by Thursday, August 28, 3:00 P.M., reacting to his/her experiences and explaining connections or realizations that occur to you as a result. To reply to someone else, click "Post a Comment" below and specify in your own writing the person to whom you're replying (e.g., "Shannon, I agree with your suggestion that . . .").

NOTE: The commenting feature will be disabled Thursday, August 28, 3:00 P.M.; you will not be able to post a comment after that time. In order both to post your own story and comment on someone else's, you will need to tend to this assignment well in advance of this deadline.